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How restored moorlands can cut flood risk

This is an archived press release

Tuesday 15 March 2016

Bringing life back to the moorsPeak District National Park chief executive Sarah Fowler is highlighting the vital role restored moorlands can play in reducing flood risk, improving water quality and storing carbon.

Sarah will speak about the work of the Moors for the Future Partnership in a presentation to The Future of Utilities conference in London today (16 March). The conference attracts key figures from energy, water and gas backgrounds.

The Moors for the Future Partnership is bringing life back to the moorlands of the Peak District National Park and the South Pennines damaged by centuries of atmospheric pollution. Over the past decade we have restored 900 hectares of badly damaged bog and protected a further 2,500 hectares of active blanket bog. One of the projects, Making Space for Water, has revealed how re-planting heavily eroded moorland can help slow the flow of water downstream and reduce flood-risk in villages, towns and cities.

Before joining the Peak District National Park early last year, Sarah led teams at the Environment Agency with responsibilities including reducing flood risk for communities

She said: “This habitat restoration covering tens of square miles in the Peak District National Park is replicated across the UK’s 15 National Parks. This work delivers significant services to those who live in the National Park and to the millions living in surrounding communities. Services like slowing the flow, improving water quality and storing carbon, as well as bringing business innovation and engaging communities in science so together we protect these landscapes for all to enjoy.”

This is an archived press release

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