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Alport Valley Project

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Alport Valley Project

What is the Project?
The Alport Re-wilding Project is a partnership project between the National Trust and the Forestry Commission which began in 2001.  The principle aim of the project is to remove the conifer plantations, and return the valley to its semi-natural state thereby improving the biodiversity of the area.

Where is it?
Alport Valley Map

What is the Purpose?
The vision for the Alport Valley over the subsequent 40 years is that the conifers will be removed and the valley will become:

  • A mosaic of semi-natural habitats, rich in wildlife
  • A living historical and cultural landscape
  • A place enjoyed and celebrated for its special qualities
  • Managed by the National Trust and Forestry Commission, in partnership with those who live in, work in, use, and love the valley

What Habitats will Benefit?
Habitats involved are upland oakwood, upland heathland and acid grassland.

What Species will Benefit?
Species which will benefit from the project include water vole, peregrine falcon, merlin, long-eared owl, skylark, curlew and lapwing.

What has already been Achieved?
20ha of conifer plantations have been removed (pictured above) to make way for natural regeneration of broadleaved species.  Some of the removed timber has been used to block gullies on Bleaklow as part of blanket bog restoration work.
A water vole survey and bird survey were carried out in 2008.

What is Planned?
To remove a further 15-20 hectares of conifers to allow for the natural regeneration of native broadleaved woodland.
Water vole surveys will be conducted every 2-3 years.
There will be ongoing bird surveys to evaluate the effectiveness of the habitat management work.

Who is Involved?
Work is carried out by National Trust and Forestry Commission staff, with external contractors brought in as necessary.  The Alport Advisory Group made up of local residents, the farming community, and shooting interests, are kept informed as the project progresses.

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