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Peak walkers advised to take extra care on farm land

This is an archived press release

Friday 15 April 2005

15 April 2005

Peak walkers advised to take extra care on farm land

Walkers in the Peak District are being asked to take extra care for their own safety after a man was attacked by a cow, breaking his ribs.

The incident happened on Baslow Edge when the man, in his 60s, and his wife were walking their dog (on April 10) across a field of cattle, having seen other walkers do the same without mishap.

A cow with a calf knocked the man to the ground, trampling on him and breaking his ribs. His wife and the dog were uninjured. Edale Mountain Rescue Team was called out to take him to an ambulance.

Jenny Waller, senior ranger for the Peak District National Park Authority, said, "Spring is an important time in the Peak District. Wildlife is breeding and it is lambing and calving time on farms as well. If bullocks or cows with young feel threatened by dogs they could charge and trample both pet and owner.

"We're asking people to take extra care over the next few weeks and, in particular, asking dog owners to take special care when walking their pets through fields with livestock. Cattle especially can be inquisitive about dogs - which can lead to problems - even if the dog is on a lead and under close control."

Similar incidents happen each year - a female dog walker was attacked last May near Little Longstone, breaking her ribs - and in rare cases such trampling can even be fatal, as happened in Sheldon several years ago.

Jenny said, "We're not wanting to scare people but we do want them to understand that livestock can be unpredictable. It's important for everyone to be aware of the dangers so that they can be prepared and enjoy a safe walk in the countryside.

"If you are chased by livestock the best advice is to get out of the field as quickly as possible, let the dog fend for itself - a dog can easily out run a cow - but call it to you as soon as you are out of danger."

Notices giving advice to the public about dogs on open access land are available free to landowners from the National Park Authority. Contact the Ranger Service on 01629 816290.

 

This is an archived press release

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