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Trail-bikes and 4x4s to be banned on two green lanes in Peak District National Park

This is an archived press release

Friday 24 January 2014

The Peak District National Park Authority has confirmed legal orders to exclude trail-bikes and 4x4s from two green lanes at the Roych and Chapel Gate, near Chapel-en-le-Frith.

The permanent Traffic Regulation Orders (TROs) will protect a 3.5km stretch of the Roych that is part of the Pennine Bridleway, and a 3km stretch of Chapel Gate which skirts Rushup Edge.

The grounds, in both cases, were to safeguard the natural beauty and special characteristics of these landscapes and the amenity for other users.

A TRO for the Roych was originally agreed in July 2013, but since then a small section has been repaired by Derbyshire County Council so the decision was brought back for review before it was implemented. Members of the Authority's Audit, Resources and Performance Committee confirmed the TRO after deciding the repairs had made no difference to their original grounds for the order.

The TRO for Chapel Gate was agreed after assessing responses to a public consultation in which 1,391 individuals and organisations objected to the proposal, and 994 were in favour.

The committee heard speakers representing both points of view.

Committee chair Christopher Pennell said: "We understand the strong feelings on both sides of this argument, but as a national park authority it is our primary statutory duty to conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the area, and that outweighs other considerations where there is a substantial conflict.

"There are some 300 green lanes usable by motorised vehicles in the national park but we are concentrating the powers given to us to consider TROs on just a very few where the impact is causing special concern.

"Both these routes cross areas of outstanding natural beauty and wildlife habitats which are enjoyed by many: Chapel Gate passes through wildlife areas with the highest protection designation in Europe, and has historic interest as a pack horse route.

"We have visited the routes several times and have listened to arguments from all sides. On balance we have decided that the conservation of the natural beauty of these landscapes outweigh unrestricted recreational motorised use on the Roych and Chapel Gate."

The Authority has drawn up action plans to manage 36 of what it calls "priority routes" where activities cause most concern. For more information go to www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/vehicles

This is an archived press release

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