Background-2-Curbar-Edge.jpg

chapter6

peak district landscape
 

Economy


 

Strategic context

6.1

Chapter 6 of the Structure Plan examines the economy of the National Park and puts forward policies for general economic activity. Other parts of the strategy, and other policies in this Local Plan also affect proposals for economic development. Obvious examples are farming and farm diversification, shops, recreation and tourism, minerals and waste disposal, and transport. There are many opportunities for small business developments in the National Park, often in converted buildings.

6.2

Structure Plan Policies E1 to E4 seek to achieve appropriate general diversification of the rural economy as follows:

 

(i)

new workspace is permitted for general economic purposes within or on the edge of towns and villages at a scale that reflects local need;

 

(ii)

warehousing is permitted as an ancillary to an existing business;

 

(iii)

employment development sites are to be identified in the Bakewell and Hope Valley areas;

 

(iv)

home-working, including teleworking, is welcomed;

 

(v)

existing industrial sites are safeguarded, unless this causes problems for the environment or neighbouring land uses.


Sites for employment in the Hope Valley and Bakewell

6.3

Structure Plan Policy E2 identifies a need for additional small employment sites to be identified in the Hope Valley, and in Bakewell which is dealt with in Chapter 12. Three sites have been identified in the Hope Valley and are shown on the Proposals Map. They already have planning permission for employment uses, but are particularly well suited to accommodate new businesses. The conversion of buildings at Hall Farm, Hathersage was permitted after the preparation of the Structure Plan and is a good example of a proposal to re-use traditional buildings, many of which are listed. Great care is needed with such schemes, but they can provide viable uses for the future and are preferable to residential use. Aston Industrial Estate is an existing use outside a settlement that would benefit from further investment with associated landscaping and improved access. Hathersage Station Yard offers an opportunity to accommodate more jobs on site (with units to rent, for example), again with associated landscaping. Policy LE1 refers to use classes B1 and B2 which are described in more detail in Appendix 11.

6.4

There are other existing employment sites in the Hope Valley where intensification may be acceptable. It is not appropriate to show them on the Proposals Map.



Policy LE1: Employment sites in the Hope Valley

(a)

The following sites are proposed for employment use:

(i)

Station Yard, Hathersage:

2 hectares

Use classes B1 and/or B2 and for existing scrap metal processing;

(ii)

Hall Farm, Hathersage:

0.25 hectares

Use class B1;


(iii)

Aston Industrial Estate:

0.65 hectares

Intensification, redevelopment or expansion of use class B1 activity, within the existing site.

(b)

Development that would prejudice the use of these sites for employment purposes will not be permitted.



Exceptional acceptance of low impact employment uses where general activity would be unsuitable

6.5

Structure Plan paragraph 6.39 encourages local product or service development: this can be linked to the appreciation of the National Park as a special place. Small scale business operations (including craft industries) can sometimes be acceptable where larger, more general development might cause unacceptable problems. The scale of an activity and any intentions for its future will be important considerations: for example when deciding whether the need to find an acceptable re-use of a visually important barn justifies an exception to the normal policy which steers general economic activity into Local Plan Settlements. Clearly, any such exceptional case should be controlled within specified limits in order to remove uncertainty about future possibilities at that location. This may require extension of the need to obtain future planning permission to matters that would not normally require it (known as exclusion of permitted development rights).



Policy LE2: Exceptional permission for Class B1 employment uses

(a)

Provided that there is sufficient benefit to the conservation and enhancement of the National Park, planning permission will be given for a B1 employment use in a building that would not otherwise be judged suitable, but only if there are adequate safeguards to minimise any adverse impact on the building, and on the valued characteristics and amenity of the area.

(b)

Permission will be restricted to the specific activity for which it is being sought, and particular attention will be paid to the following so as to minimise any adverse impact:

(i)

the scale, intensity and type of activity, including vehicular movements and hours of operation;

and

(ii)

the arrangement of parking and/or storage of vehicles, equipment and materials.

(c)

Where necessary and appropriate:

(i)

permitted development rights (particularly for further buildings or structures) will be excluded;

and

(ii)

permission will initially be restricted to a period of (usually) 2 years and/or for the personal benefit of the occupant of the building. If the arrangements for minimising the development's impact prove to be unacceptable in practice, further permission will not be granted.



Home working

6.6

The National Park Authority's support for a flexible approach to working from home is set out in Structure Plan Policy E3. In many cases, where the overall character of the residential use is not changed, home working does not require planning permission. Where this character is changed to some degree, and permission is needed, it is reasonable to require clear limits to the type and size of activity, providing reassurance and certainty to neighbours. Businesses such as taxi firms, for example, can cause problems if they expand to the point where more than one or two vehicles operate from a domestic setting, particularly if these cannot be accommodated on the site.



Policy LE3: Home working

Planning permission for home working will be restricted to a specified activity within use class B1. Planning conditions and/or obligations will be used as necessary and appropriate to control any aspects of the business activity likely to affect the valued characteristics residential character or amenity of the area including:

(i)

the exclusion of permitted development rights for further buildings or structures;

and

(ii)

the scale, intensity and type of activity, including vehicular movements and hours of operation;

and

(iii)

the arrangement of parking and/or storing of vehicles, equipment and materials.



Expansion of existing industrial and business developments

6.7

Many business enterprises grow. However, in the National Park the importance of landscape and other conservation considerations imposes limits that are often more stringent than elsewhere. The impact on local amenity can also be greater in small settlements. If expansion on site is clearly likely to pose difficulties, businesses are encouraged to consider whether their needs can be met by operating in suitable nearby buildings or satellite premises, making maximum use of communications technology. Advice on potential alternatives will be given wherever possible.

6.8

Some businesses are located in areas of countryside where they would not now be permitted if just starting up. In such cases it is essential that any expansion of business activity does not compromise the conservation of the special characteristics of the area. Particular care will need to be taken to ensure that should further expansion be allowed, it will be carried out to the highest standards in order to enhance the current appearance of the site. Existing sites may well benefit from new investment and more efficient use. Entrepreneurs considering substantial investment in new buildings or activities should consider if this can be located in or adjacent to a Local Plan Settlement (see Policy LC2).



Policy LE4: Industrial and business expansion

(a)

Expansion of an existing industry or business in or on the edge of a Local Plan Settlement will be permitted provided that:

(i)

It is operating in an appropriate location;

and

(ii)

the use remains of a scale and type intended to meet local needs;

and

(iii)

development can be accommodated without harm to the amenity and valued characteristics of the area or to traffic safety and circulation;

and

(iv)

new or extended buildings and working areas are clearly justified and proper consideration has been given to the possibilities of using appropriate existing buildings to meet the needs of the business.

(b)

Outside Local Plan Settlements, expansion of existing industrial and business development (other than that linked to homeworking, farm diversification, forestry, mineral working and appropriate recreational activity) will not be permitted unless:

(i)

it is of a modest scale in relation to the existing activity and/or buildings, and does not extend the physical limits of the established use;

and

(ii)

it does not harm and wherever possible secures an enhancement to the amenity and valued characteristics of the area and the appearance of the site;

and

(iii)

new or extended buildings are clearly justified and proper consideration has been given to the possibilities of using appropriate existing buildings to meet the needs of the business.



Change of use of industrial sites

6.9

Structure Plan Policy E4 safeguards existing employment and industrial sites, retaining them for similar use unless they cause severe problems for the amenity of the surrounding area. Warehousing is only permissible where it is ancillary to an existing business and fulfils a need that cannot be met elsewhere (Policy E1). It should be emphasised that retail activity is not usually acceptable on such a site. On the other hand a supplier to nearby trades, or a business such as an exhaust fitting centre that is difficult to accommodate elsewhere, might be acceptable. Factory shops are dealt with in Chapter 5 (Policy LS3).



Policy LE5: Retail uses in industrial and business areas

Retail operations will not be permitted in industrial and business areas unless they are specialist uses of a size and type suited to local need and cannot be located elsewhere.


6.10

When sites are developed for industrial and other employment uses, their impact on the surrounding area and the amenity of neighbouring properties often depends on the care taken to achieve adequate screening and on subsequent standards of operating practice or site maintenance. Untidy or inappropriate use of outdoor areas, noise, operating times and use of floodlighting can pose particular problems. It will often be necessary to make use of planning conditions and/or agreements (planning obligations) to ensure best practice and high standards are adhered to (see paragraphs 2.7 to 2.10). The adequacy of local roads to cope with vehicles going to and from employment sites is also an important consideration (see Structure Plan policy T1(b) and Local Plan policy LT9). Design Policy LC4 will also be relevant.

6.11

Structure Plan Policy T7 makes provision for road haulage operating centres provided that they are not in Conservation Areas or residential areas and are accessible to the strategic road network without using roads subject to a weight restriction order. Road haulage often supplements the income of a farming family. One or two vehicles can often be accommodated without great harm to surrounding countryside. Problems can quickly arise, however, if outside storage of vehicle parts and other materials proliferates without adequate screening, or if regular lorry movements make use of inappropriate routes or otherwise harm the amenity of the area.

6.12

Where development is part of farm diversification, Policy LC14 also applies.



Policy LE6: Design, layout and neighbourliness of employment sites including haulage depots

(a)

Where development for employment purposes is acceptable in principle, it will only be permitted provided that every practicable means is used to minimise any adverse effects on the valued characteristics and amenity of the surrounding area. Particular attention will be given to:

(i)

visibility from vantage points;

and

(ii)

site access, vehicular circulation and parking;

and

(iii)

site layout and use of open space surrounding buildings;

and

(iv)

storage of vehicles or other equipment;

and

(v)

landscaping and other screening;

and

(vi)

noise and proposed times of operation.

(b)

Where necessary, planning permission will restrict the future scale and intensity of the activities on site.

Share this page