Background-2-Curbar-Edge.jpg

Access and rights of way

access-wild-side

Public rights of way

Public rights of way are linear routes which fall into four categories. They are the legal responsibility of and maintained by Highway Authorities. Details of the routes are held on the Highway Authorities' Definitive Maps.

Footpaths - are for use on foot only.

They are shown on OS 1:25,000 Explorer maps as Footpaths

Bridleways - are for use on foot, on a horse or on a pedal cycle.

They are shown on OS 1:25,000 Explorer maps as Bridleways

Restricted byways – are for use on foot, on a horse or pedal cycle, or by horse drawn vehicle.

They are shown on OS 1:25,000 Explorer maps as Restricted byways

Byways open to all traffic - are available for any mode of transport - on foot, on a horse, on a pedal cycle or motorcycle, or in a motor or horse-drawn vehicle. However, they are mainly for use as footpaths or bridleways and are usually unsealed.

They are shown on OS 1:25,000 Explorer maps as BOATs


Other linear routes

Green lanes – is a term used to describe routes which have or may have the potential to carry motorised vehicle rights. They may be Byways open to all traffic (BOATS) or unsealed unclassified roads (UCRs). UCRs are often shown on OS 1:25,000 Explorer maps as ‘Other Routes with Public Access’ (ORPAs): UCRs

More information on vehicles in the National Park can be seen at www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/vehicles.

Trails – are the former railway lines which are owned by the Authority and available for use on foot, on a horse or on a pedal cycle. More information on the trails can be seen at www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/trails.

Permissive paths - are where a landowner gives agreement for public access. There is no statutory legal right to use these routes and permission may be withdrawn. They are shown on OS 1:25,000 Explorer maps as footpaths Permissive footpath or bridleways Permissive bridleway.

Some that have been negotiated under agri-environmental schemes can be seen at the Natural England website.


Access land

Access land is a term which covers area access. It falls into 3 categories:

Open access land – this is for access on foot. Additional rights may be provided by public rights of way or the landowner. The land is shown on OS 1:25,000 Explorer maps in a yellow wash or in a light green wash on woodlands. The NPA is responsible for managing access to and on this land. More information about land designated under the Countryside and Rights of Way (CRoW) Act 2000 can be seen at www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/crow.

Common land – this is shown on OS explorer maps in a yellow wash or in a light green wash on woodlands. There may be other rights in addition to a right on foot. The seven constituent councils in the National Park are Commons Authorities with the responsibility for common land.

Permissive access – this is where a landowner gives agreement for public access. This is usually negotiated under agri-environmental schemes and can be seen at the Natural England website. The National Park Authority, National Trust, Natural England, the water companies and the Forestry Commission also seek to enable access on their land.

Share this page