Do I need permission?

peak district landscape

First check:

If your property falls within the boundary of the Peak District National Park and you want to make changes to your house or your land, you may need planning permission depending on the nature and scale of the change.

You should always contact us for advice if you want to make changes:


Your house may have permitted development rights attached to it. If it does, you may be able to make minor alterations or extensions to your house without applying for planning permission (provided you meet certain conditions). Sometimes, the permitted development rights on your property may be restricted in order to preserve the characteristics of the local area.

Planning decisions are also affected by a property's planning history. Each case and each property is different, so we give advice on a case-by-case basis. The advice we give to your neighbour may be different to the advice we give you. Because each property is different, we recommend you contact us for advice.

To help you find an answer to your query, we also have a set of commonly asked questions and answers.

Agricultural land or commercial properties

In the majority of cases, you will need planning permission to make changes to agricultural land or commercial property.

  • For agricultural land, if you want to put up a building or change how the land is used, you will need planning permission.
  • For shops, businesses and churches, you may need permission to display an advertisement or sign depending on its size and where it is sited. You will also need planning permission if you change how the building is used.

We recommend that you contact us for advice.

Creation and alteration of tracks

The provision of new vehicular tracks and alterations to existing tracks can often help in the sustainable management of moorlands, grasslands and woodlands, for example.  However, new and altered tracks can have significant effects on the character and appearance of the landscape and the archaeology and biodiversity of the National Park.  In many cases planning permission will be needed.

If you wish to create or alter a track we recommend reading our advice note.

Top five tips

  1. Get advice from a planning officer as early as possible in your project.
  2. Remember each case is different and each property has a different planning history.
  3. Give us as much information as possible (including drawings, maps, plans, photos, measurements).
  4. We can only offer you good advice if we have all the correct information.
  5. Remember that we are here to help you. Last year, we approved 90% of applications.

Did you know?

You may be surprised to learn that the following changes could need planning permission:

  • digging a pond in a field
  • creating a mound in your garden
  • building a terrace or raised patio

As a general rule, we recommend you contact us for advice if you intend to:

  • use a digger
  • employ a builder
  • change the use of a building
  • put up an advertisement

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